Baltimore City Council
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File #: 17-0040R    Version: 0 Name: Increased Transparency About Police-Seized Property
Type: City Council Resolution Status: Withdrawn
File created: 8/14/2017 In control: City Council
On agenda: Final action: 7/6/2020
Enactment #:
Title: Increased Transparency About Police-Seized Property For the purpose of requesting that the Police Department provide the City Council with a full accounting of all seized guns, drugs, dirt bikes, and cash over the last 5 years, along with a thorough explanation of how this material was disposed of, how long the disposal process typically takes, and what the best ways to include community representatives in that process may be.
Sponsors: Robert Stokes, Sr., President Young, Bill Henry, Brandon M. Scott, Ryan Dorsey, Kristerfer Burnett, John T. Bullock, Zeke Cohen, Sharon Green Middleton, Eric T. Costello, Leon F. Pinkett, III, Shannon Sneed, Mary Pat Clarke, Isaac "Yitzy" Schleifer, Edward Reisinger
Indexes: Increases, Police, Property, Transparency
Attachments: 1. 17-0040R~1st Reader, 2. Police 17-0040R, 3. Finance 17-0040R
* Warning: This is an unofficial, introductory copy of the bill.
The official copy considered by the City Council is the first reader copy.
Introductory*

City of Baltimore
Council Bill R
(Resolution)

Introduced by: Councilmember Stokes



A Resolution Entitled

A Council Resolution concerning
title
Increased Transparency About Police-Seized Property
For the purpose of requesting that the Police Department provide the City Council with a full accounting of all seized guns, drugs, dirt bikes, and cash over the last 5 years, along with a thorough explanation of how this material was disposed of, how long the disposal process typically takes, and what the best ways to include community representatives in that process may be.
body

Recitals

Recent events have highlighted the importance of restoring the trust of all communities in Baltimore’s Police Department. Implementation of the consent decree between the Department and the U.S. Department of Justice is expected to bring forward many tangible reforms to improve relations between the public and the police. However, it is important to take whatever confidence building steps can be independently identified in the meantime as well.

One such idea that has been raised in the past would be requiring civilian monitoring of police disposition of seized property and contraband. While there’s nothing to suggest that the Police Department routinely mishandles this property, skepticism amongst some segments of the public about police claims regarding the destruction of guns, drugs, dirt bikes and other contraband has sometimes been a source of friction.

Involving civilian witnesses in the Pol...

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