Baltimore City Council
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File #: 20-0231R    Version: Name: Informational Hearing - Bringing Back Victory Gardens
Type: City Council Resolution Status: Adopted
File created: 6/15/2020 In control: Health
On agenda: Final action: 8/17/2020
Enactment #:
Title: Informational Hearing - Bringing Back Victory Gardens For the purpose of inviting the Health Commissioner, the Director of Recreation and Parks, the Director of Sustainability, and community leaders to discuss the efficacy of increasing community gardens within our neighborhoods in order to offset COVID-19 and its ancillary effects as well as generally making our City a greener, healthier, and cleaner place to live.
Indexes: Informational Hearing, Victory Gardens
Attachments: 1. 20-0231R~1st Reader, 2. Sustainability 20-0231R, 3. Rec and Parks 20-0231R, 4. BCHD 20-0231R, 5. Bill Synopsis 20-0231R, 6. Written Testimony 1, 7. Written Testimony 2, 8. Written Testimony 3, 9. Written Testimony 4, 10. Written Testimony 5, 11. Written Testimony 6, 12. Written Testimony 7, 13. Written Testimony 8, 14. Written Testimony 9, 15. written testimony - pamplet, 16. Hearing Notes 231R 8 5 20, 17. Abby Cocke presentation - Sustainability Office 8 5 20, 18. 20-0231R~2nd Reader
* Warning: This is an unofficial, introductory copy of the bill.
The official copy considered by the City Council is the first reader copy.
Introductory*

City of Baltimore
Council Bill R
(Resolution)

Introduced by: Councilmember Burnett


A Resolution Entitled

A Council Resolution concerning
title
Informational Hearing - Bringing Back Victory Gardens
For the purpose of inviting the Health Commissioner, the Director of Recreation and Parks, the Director of Sustainability, and community leaders to discuss the efficacy of increasing community gardens within our neighborhoods in order to offset COVID-19 and its ancillary effects as well as generally making our City a greener, healthier, and cleaner place to live.
body

Recitals

During World War II, amid rationing for the war effort, the federal government encouraged the establishment of community “victory gardens” to grow fruits and vegetables for subsistence. By May 1943, there were 18 million community gardens across the United States and they accounted for approximately one-third of our food.

Today, we are in a similar state of crisis. This time, instead of global war, we are in the midst of a global pandemic. Along with this crisis, there are continuing concerns about potential interruptions in the transportation and labor markets for fresh fruits and vegetables. As such, it is incumbent on us to bridge the gap for Baltimoreans to access fresh fruits and vegetables. Indeed, this is made all the more critical given the interdependence that the we as a country have with our trading partners and their own interruptions in food supply.

The combination of COVID-19 and certain underlying health conditions can cause severe illness and death. Thu...

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