Baltimore City Council
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File #: 21-0181    Version: 0 Name: City Property - Renaming Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School to Beatrice “Bea” Gaddy Elementary/Middle School
Type: Ordinance Status: Withdrawn
File created: 11/15/2021 In control: Baltimore City Council
On agenda: Final action: 12/9/2021
Enactment #:
Title: City Property - Renaming Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School to Beatrice “Bea” Gaddy Elementary/Middle School For the purpose of changing the name of Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School, located at 600 North Patterson Park Avenue, to Beatrice “Bea” Gaddy Elementary/Middle School.
Sponsors: Antonio Glover, Robert Stokes, Sr., John T. Bullock
Indexes: City Property - Renaming
Attachments: 1. 21-0181~1st Reader, 2. Law 21-0181, 3. BDC 21-0181
* Warning: This is an unofficial, introductory copy of the bill.
The official copy considered by the City Council is the first reader copy.
Introductory*

City of Baltimore
Council Bill R
(Resolution)

Introduced by: Councilmember Glover and Councilmember Stokes


A Resolution Entitled

A Council Resolution concerning
title
City Property - Renaming Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School to Beatrice “Bea” Gaddy Elementary/Middle School
For the purpose of changing the name of Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School, located at 600 North Patterson Park Avenue, to Beatrice “Bea” Gaddy Elementary/Middle School.
body

By authority of
Article 5 - Finance, Property, and Procurement
Section 20-2
Baltimore City Code
(Edition 2000)

Recitals

Beatrice “Bea” Gaddy, a Baltimore City Councilmember and champion for Baltimore’s underdogs, arrived in Baltimore in 1964 as a single mother with 5 children. Gaddy earned her bachelors degree from Antioch University in and in the early 1970s joined the East Baltimore Children’s Fund. Using what she learned from her experienced with the Fund, Gaddy founded a homeless shelter, which became the Bea Gaddy Family Centers, Inc. In 1981 she started a community kitchen for Baltimoreans in need, and held an annual free Thanksgiving dinner that became well known in the City. Later, Gaddy also founded a furniture bank and a program refurbishing abandoned City row homes. She became an ordained pastor and buried the poor at no charge to their families. Gaddy won many awards during her time in Baltimore, including Afro American Woman of the Year in 1984, the National Council of Negro Women Humanitarian Awar...

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