Baltimore City Council
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File #: 17-0046R    Version: 0 Name: Request for State Action - Police Redistricting
Type: City Council Resolution Status: Adopted
File created: 9/18/2017 In control: Judiciary and Legislative Investigations
On agenda: Final action: 12/4/2017
Enactment #:
Title: Request for State Action - Police Redistricting For the purpose of calling on the Baltimore City Delegation to the 2018 Maryland General Assembly to secure enactment of legislation requiring that the Baltimore City Police Department review and adjust police district boundaries after the information from each decennial census becomes available to ensure that Baltimore’s security resources are allocated as efficiently as possible.
Sponsors: Brandon M. Scott, Bill Henry, Eric T. Costello, Isaac "Yitzy" Schleifer, Leon F. Pinkett, III, Ryan Dorsey, Kristerfer Burnett, John T. Bullock, Zeke Cohen, Sharon Green Middleton, Shannon Sneed, Mary Pat Clarke, Edward Reisinger, Robert Stokes, Sr.
Indexes: Police, Redistricting, Request for State Action
Attachments: 1. 17-0046R~1st Reader, 2. Police 17-0046R, 3. 17-0046R~2nd Reader, 4. Completed Legislative File 17-0046R
* Warning: This is an unofficial, introductory copy of the bill.
The official copy considered by the City Council is the first reader copy.
Introductory*

City of Baltimore
Council Bill R
(Resolution)

Introduced by: Councilmember Scott



A Resolution Entitled

A Council Resolution concerning
title
Request for State Action - Police Redistricting
For the purpose of calling on the Baltimore City Delegation to the 2018 Maryland General Assembly to secure enactment of legislation requiring that the Baltimore City Police Department review and adjust police district boundaries after the information from each decennial census becomes available to ensure that Baltimore’s security resources are allocated as efficiently as possible.
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Recitals

Baltimore City’s Police Department divides the 86 square miles under its jurisdiction into 9 police districts of varying size for administrative purposes. Typically, each of the 9 districts is staffed with roughly the same number of officers.

District boundaries have remained unchanged for years despite significant changes in both population numbers and distribution since the present boundaries were adopted, as well as changes in the security needs of various neighborhoods over this timespan. Today, the districts vary significantly in area, population, and number of calls for services. A study of 2012 call for service data, for instance, found that the least active district had only 60% as many calls for service as the most active district.

Without periodic review and revision of the district boundaries it is likely that changing circumstances will lead to increasingly inefficient allocation...

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