Baltimore City Council
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File #: 19-0161R    Version: 0 Name: International Overdose Awareness Day
Type: City Council Resolution Status: Adopted
File created: 8/19/2019 In control: City Council
On agenda: Final action: 8/19/2019
Enactment #:
Title: International Overdose Awareness Day For the purpose of recognizing August 31, 2019 as International Overdose Awareness Day.
Sponsors: Kristerfer Burnett, President Brandon M. Scott, Zeke Cohen, Danielle McCray, Ryan Dorsey, Bill Henry, Sharon Green Middleton, Leon F. Pinkett, III, John T. Bullock, Eric T. Costello, Mary Pat Clarke, Robert Stokes, Sr., Edward Reisinger, Isaac "Yitzy" Schleifer
Indexes: Awareness, Overdose
Attachments: 1. 19-0161R-1st Reader
* Warning: This is an unofficial, introductory copy of the bill.
The official copy considered by the City Council is the first reader copy.
Introductory*

City of Baltimore
Council Bill R
(Resolution)

Introduced by: Councilmember Burnett


A Resolution Entitled

A Council Resolution concerning
title
International Overdose Awareness Day
For the purpose of recognizing August 31, 2019 as International Overdose Awareness Day.
body

Recitals

August 31, 2019 is International Overdose Awareness Day. This is a day that is recognized in communities around the world as a day that aims to publicly challenge the stigma associated with substance use disorder, to raise awareness of overdose, and to remember those who have died or suffered permanent injury due to drug overdose. International Overdose Awareness Day is also intended to send a message of support and hope to families and friends of those suffering from substance use disorder, as well as current, and former substance users.

Here in Baltimore, the disease of addiction impacts social determinants of health that may decrease life expectancy and quality of life for our residents. More than 25,000 Baltimore City residents suffer from substance use disorder. In 2018 alone, 888 Baltimoreans died due to overdosing. In that same year, Baltimore City had the highest age-adjusted overdose mortality rate among large metropolitan counties in the U.S. Since 2007, Baltimore City has lost 4,565 lives to opioid overdose. To that end, the Health Commissioner of Baltimore City has declared opioid overdose a public health emergency.

Racial and socioeconomic disparities have negatively impacted Baltimore City residents, creating barriers for communities to access...

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